Just listed for $4,550,000 – 53 Hazelton Avenue

Listing-53-Hazelton-Avenue-TBReady To Live On Hazelton Avenue? Love Yorkville Village Life Style? The Most Beautiful And Prestigious Street In Toronto.

Peaceful and Quiet 19 Ft Frontage Victorian Style Semi-Detached With Amazing Front and Backyard Gardens And Detached Two Car Garage On The Back. Beautiful The Way It Is And Seller Is Offering Committee Of Adjustment Approved Site Plan For 3500 Sq. Renovation and Addition.

Extras: Steps From Subway Line, Top Designers Boutiques, High End Restaurants And University Of Toronto. Whole Foods And Much More. Fridge, Stove, Dishwasher, Washer, Dryer, Window Covering, All Elfs, Sunroom

 

 

If you would like to discuss options please call us at 416-927-9898 or email at tkonkina@rogers.com and we will get back to you within the next 24 hours.

 

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Just Listed: 33 Charles St E, 4302, Toronto $1,649,000

Listing-33-Charles-St-EYonge & Bloor At Your Feet! Stunning 1450 Sq Ft Penthouse W/Postcard South East Views, Flr To Ceiling Windowslooking Onto The Skyline & Lake! Beautifully Upgraded.

Fashionable Casa Condominiums, A Luxurious 46 Storey Glass & Steel Tower W/State-Of-The-Art Amenities! Oversized 415 Sq Ft Wrap Around Balcony W/Gas Bbq Hookup, Eng Hrdwd Flrs Throughout, 7′ Baseboards & 10′ Smooth Ceilings, Den Can Be 3rd Br.

Extras: Scavolini Glass Kitchen Cabinets, Subzero, Wolf & Miele Appl’s, Island W/Brkfst Bar, Valance Lighting, Granite C-Tops, B-Splash, Pot Lights, Free Standing Tub, Glass Walls In Master Bathroom, Double Side Fireplace ( Master/Living).

 

 

If you would like to discuss options please call us at 416-927-9898 or email at tkonkina@rogers.com and we will get back to you within the next 24 hours.

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Just listed for $495,000: 1103 Leslie Street 808, Toronto

Listing-33-1103-Leslie-St-808Welcome To The Luxurious Carrington Place! 2 Bedrooms Corner 883 Sq Ft Suite With Private Balcony Overlooking City & Leslie Park. Very Practical Layout: Split Bdrm, 2 Baths. Master Bedroom With 3 Piece Bath & W/I Closet. Laminate Throughout. Granit Counter Top. Open Concept Kitchen.

Short Walk To Wicket Creek Trails And Leslie-Sunnybrook Park ,To Ttc And Future Eglinton Subway. Upscale Building . Professionally Landscaped Courtyard

Extras: All Appliances. Stove, Fridge, Dishwasher, Washer And Dryer.

 

 

If you would like to discuss options please call us at 416-927-9898 or email at tkonkina@rogers.com and we will get back to you within the next 24 hours.

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OPP. Today – No housing market bubble in Canada, says report

By Adrian Bishop, OPP.Today

Canadian property prices are likely to rise 5.3% on average in 2017, twice the consensus of other estimates – but there is no market bubble, says a leading developer.

A significant share of housing demand in Canada is coming from the approximately 300,000 new immigrants that arrived in 2016, according to The Fortress RDI forecast for Spring 2017, the Market Manuscript,  which is a bi-annual report on the Canadian housing market

There has never been so much focus on residential housing markets in Canada as there is today, especially as Toronto and Vancouver have been named among the hottest housing markets in the world, says the report.

“For years, people have falsely claimed that the Canadian housing market is in a bubble, but now that residential house prices are accelerating faster than any country in the world, it is worthwhile to examine the subject again.

“The biggest problem stems from the fact that most people don’t have the foggiest idea what a housing 2300bubble is, how you would identify it, and why it is something a country or metro area should avoid.

“There are numerous definitions of what bubbles are, but here is a good one from the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) out of the United Kingdom: “The idea of a ‘bubble’ is that asset prices are driven by expectations of future price increases rather than by the intrinsic value of the asset involved.” IFS identifies three key elements of a bubble: speculative buying for capital gain, speculative lending to non-credit-worthy clients, and a trajectory of explosive price increases (typically followed by an equally spectacular collapse). The federal government in Canada is currently considering these elements, especially the second one, despite claims to the contrary, says the report, but there is little evidence of rapid speculation in the Canadian housing market.

Housing demand is supported by record immigration in Canada. Ottawa recently confirmed that their immigration target for 2017 at 300,000. Immigration has trended upward since the late 1990s when annual immigration dropped to approximately 175,000.

Senior Vice-President of Market Research and Analytics, Ben Myers, says, “With the high price growth in 2016, there is much debate regarding the market dynamics that are pushing up values and whether the housing market is a bubble waiting to burst.

“This report differentiates fact from fiction and anticipates where the housing market is headed in 2017, especially in the red hot Toronto market.”

“The 15% foreign buyers tax implemented in B.C. in August clearly impacted the market, with transactions plummeting and average prices dipping. However, part of the decline in average prices and the number of homes traded is the result of domestic buyers’ and sellers’ expectations of a huge drop in values as a result of the tax.

“Don’t misconstrue the impact of the tax with buyers’ and sellers’ opinions of the future impact of the tax! The biggest impact has been felt on single-detached housing in Vancouver, with 18 of the 22 sub-areas within the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver  declining over the last three months of 2016 (only three of those areas have average prices under $800,000). However, just eight of the 22 sub-areas have experienced a decline since October for apartments. So, in reality, the tax made houses slightly less expensive for rich people and did very little for affordability in the marketplace.

CIBC’s Ben Tal says that when the fog clears, the foreign buyers tax will have less impact than people think it will. It will be worthwhile revisiting prices in Vancouver in six months—that will be a much better test of its impact once the “shock and awe” of the surprise tax wears off.

People clearly think a tax will work in Toronto as well, a poll conducted by Mainstreet Research in the fall of 2016 found that 52% of Torontonians favoured a tax on foreign buyers; only 21% opposed it, says the report.

“Despite CMHC’s 2016 survey showing a noticeable decline in foreign ownership of existing condominium apartments in Vancouver, Toronto, and Montreal in comparison to 2015, Canadians will continue to blame foreign buyers as long as the media keeps the topic at the forefront of their coverage of the market. The election of Donald Trump, and the continued coverage of Brexit and global protectionism, will prevent the topic from fading away in 2017.”

Eighty-four percent of online respondents to the Fortress social media survey expect Canadian resale house prices to increase in 2017.

Domestic and international analysts have compiled a list of the root causes of house price inflation, including the increase in high-paying jobs in Canada, and the tendency of these jobs to concentrate in cities.

Canadian residential builders and developers cite the lack of new supply as primary driver of resale house price inflation. Low borrowing costs and high immigration were also frequently named.

Assessing when house prices are out of line with economic fundamentals is as much art as science but the foreign buyer tax imposed in Vancouver is not the solution, the report suggests. “Lost in the foreign buyers tax debate is this conundrum: If Vancouverites and Torontonians have such a problem with offshore purchasers, why are so many of them willing to sell their houses to them?”

The typical measures to identify a housing bubble, like price-to-income, are insufficient. Between 2000 and 2015, house prices went up faster than wages in Australia, Sweden, UK, France, Korea, Finland, and Spain, the report points out.

High-ratio mortgages in Canada are decreasing while first-time homebuyers increase down payments. Only 9% of Canadians that purchased a home between 2014-2016 have less than 10% equity in their home.

International evidence suggests bans on foreign buyers won’t stabilize house prices. CMHC’s Evan Siddall believes foreign investment clearly is a factor in house price gains, but restrictions don’t always ease prices.

Elasticity of supply is the most important concept in housing right now. If supply is ‘inelastic’ (unresponsive), higher demand will translate into higher prices rather than more residential construction.

The probability of a housing market crash in Canada is low. Housing market disasters among OECD countries occur with a probability of 3% every year per the Bank of Canada economic analysis department.

Low interest rates are set to remain for some time. “A very substantial resurgence of economic growth, income growth, and/or inflation would have to occur (and the rise would have to be sustainable), before we’ll see any rapid rise in interest rates in Canada.”

The number of new housing units launched last year fell 10% annually to 35,611 units, while new home sales jumped 12% to 47,161 units, a nearly 12,000-unit gap.

The consensus forecast for 2017 is calling for about 39,000 housing starts, a nearly identical year as 2016, but above the 10-year average of 36,229.

Back of the envelope calculations reveals that the Toronto CMA is building about 30% less square footage than it did 15 years ago, despite a similar level of total unit completions.

The 52% decline in GTA unsold ground-oriented new home supply contributed to the 19.9% year-over-year price increase in that market segment.

The Urbanation unsold index price for new condominiums climbed to $645 per square foot in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) in 2016, an increase of 7%. Resale condo price growth topped 15% annually last year per the MLS HPI.

Nearly 60% of developers believe urban containment policies like the Greenbelt, the Places to Grow Act, or the Agricultural Land Reserve are responsible for high new home prices.

Low municipal approvals are contributing to higher new home prices with 30% of developers indicating it will take them five or more years to get approvals on their suburban single-family housing developments, while 5% of developers anticipate 10 years or more.

Developers are not holding land with more than 80% wanting to develop their properties as soon as possible and 17% of developers that own approved lands choosing to be strategic about when they launch their sales programs per survey.

There is a fundamental disconnect between experts in the real estate market about the idiosyncrasies of each other’s areas of expertise, and their opinion on how they impact housing market valuations, says the report.

Economists are the most trusted source of housing market opinion and analysis according to the Fortress social media survey (54%), followed by developers at 15%, and urban planners at 10%.

The Halo Effect, where urban housing demand pressures spill over into  areas surrounding Toronto, has resulted in double-digit price gains in Hamilton, Brantford, Cambridge, the Niagara Region, Guelph and Barrie.

When construction completes on new units and they are occupied, there are ripples throughout the housing market as new occupants leave another dwelling. This frees up a unit for someone else.

In future, about 35% of Canadian developers are looking at developing singles and townhouses outside their metro area, with 31% looking at suburban condominium projects per the Fortress developer survey.

Fortress Real Developments Inc. is a Canadian real estate development company that seeks out and analyzes real estate development opportunities in major Canadian markets. The company is focused on quality projects  in residential low-rise, high-rise, and commercial market segments.

February housing numbers

by Brandon Donnelly

The Building Industry and Land Development Association (BILD) announced its February (2017) numbers today for the Greater Toronto Area. Here are some of the highlights:

– At the end of February, there were 324 detached homes available in developer inventories. Ten years ago, this number was was 12,064 (detached only).

– If you consider all low-rise homes (detached, semi-detached, and towns) the above numbers are 1,001 (2017) and 17,304 (2007), respectively.

– Average price of a new detached house is now $1,469,449. For all ground-related housing – again, including semis and towns – it’s $1,081,013.

– There were more than twice as many condo apartments sold than low-rise homes in February.

– Condo inventory is also dropping and reached a low of 10,342 units.

– Average price of a new condo increased to $652 per square foot and the average unit size decreased to 802 square feet.

Here’s that information in a chart from Altus Group:

FebruaryHousesNumber
The overall story here continues to be about decreasing inventory and increasing prices. There’s also the ongoing shift from low-rise to higher density housing, which I don’t view as a bad thing.

Why Toronto Absolutely Does Not Need A Foreign Buyers Tax On Housing

by Brad Lamb

Many “real estate experts” have weighed in on Toronto’s rising real estate market recently. Many are calling our market a bubble, some are calling for an investor tax similar to the one recently imposed in Vancouver.

I have eaten, drank, and slept the Toronto real estate marketplace for 30 years.  I have been a large scale buyer and investor, one of the top real estate agents and brokers in the city, and developed thousands of condos in Toronto.

I have sold approximately 28,000 properties for close to $8 billion since 1988 as a broker and I was one of a handful of people in the real estate industry in 1996 that kick-started a moribund new development industry. I was there at ground zero.  Since 1995, I have been the exclusive new development broker for over 120 new developments in Toronto. I have advised dozens of large scale developers on how to revive many downtown districts.  I also advised them on the style, design, pricing, and marketing of the projects as well as sold all of their product. Lamb Development Corp. has delivered 14 large scale buildings to the city since 2003. In addition, we have a further 15 buildings in various stages of development. I have spoken to and listened to tens of thousands of buyers, sellers, and investors accumulating a vast storehouse of data and information over the last 30 years.

I have some 90,000 hours dedicated to my profession and have participated in virtually every level of the real estate economy. My opinions are entirely based on “real world” experience and knowledge.

An investor tax would be an egregious error in policy. It was an error in Vancouver and will only result in higher prices in that city. We will see rising prices in Vancouver within 3-12 months as consumers regain confidence in a city with no supply. Nothing will stop Vancouver’s rising prices except more supply. At some point prices will fall due to a national recession, but they will recover quickly.

In Toronto, the same result will occur with an investor tax. It could also precipitate a Canada-wide recession.

Foreign investors are involved in 2 areas in the GTA.

1. They represent a significant percentage of buyers in the 416/905 single family homes market over $4 million.

2. They represent a significant percentage of buyers in the purchase of new development condos sold from floor plans in the 416/905.

Ask any real estate agent that lines up for open houses and routinely deals with multiple offers in the $400,000-$2 million range of the market and you will quickly find out that the buyers are almost entirely local end users.

Does anyone care that very rich people might pay more for homes? I doubt it.  Without foreign investors to buy new condos from floor plans, many new buildings will not be able to move forward. These buyers are a massive resource that helps ensure the huge number of high-rise projects get financed and built. Take them away and the projects will not happen, or at least happen less. All of the new 5-star hotels would never have got off the ground without foreign investors.

Why is that important? Condominium development has fed the growth of commercial, institutional, and retail development in the city. Take it away and much less will happen. Google, Shopify, Deloitte, SNC Lavalin, Amazon, and dozens of other large employers all moved downtown because of the condo boom. All of the people that crowd the streets are a result of condos. Sewer repair and expansion, parks growth, transit – all of it is dependent on Toronto’s condo market filling city coffers. Every new condo project contributes to a park levy that is used for creating new parks. The $1 billion rail deck park will be funded almost entirely by the condo industry. These contributions can be as large as $20 million per development.  The real estate industry represents 14% of the economy for Ontario. Kill the new condo market, kill the Ontario economy. Kill the Ontario economy and Canada falls too. Foreign investors will not buy in Toronto with a 15% tax imposed.

Losing these valuable new buildings will result in tens of thousands of affordable condo rentals and future sales inventory from ever reaching the market place. Very often, early investors are early sellers once the building is complete. Taking away the valuable resale inventory will drive prices higher and guarantee higher rental rates for apartments. There is not enough interest from local buyers and investors to ensure a large project’s financial success. Foreign investors buy real estate with different investment expectations as they do in New York City and London.

Creating a 15% foreign buyers tax will seriously harm the new development industry. Do this and you guarantee a further shortage of affordable resale and rentals. You will also likely injure the Ontario economy. Less development equates to a slower economy.

Cadillac Fairview just announced a new office tower by the Air Canada Centre. They will be building it on spec. Their confidence comes from a lack of concern for finding tenants. This is because many commercial tenants want to be downtown because they have a huge pool of talent at their doorstep; thank you to the condo market. Nobu just announced a new 5-star hotel and restaurant.  Nobu typically opens in hip, cool cities. Why are we now worthy? Thank the condo market. Nobu will only get completed if the 700 condos that are part of the development get sold quickly. No foreign investors? No way.

We currently have prices rising too quickly. They will naturally outrun themselves in a year or so. Affordability and local investor malaise will kick in shortly and naturally. Governments should not interfere with markets, let them run their course. A bursting bubble is not going to happen in this environment.  Prices will run out of steam, and soon. Some people are saying this is a demand sided problem, this is nonsense. Of course demand is high, this is Toronto, and Toronto is now on the world stage. Little new inventory will ever be added to the supply of 416 freehold product. That is a supply issue only.  No supply plus increasing demand due to immigration and demographic change will guarantee 416 homes will continue to climb. The 416 condo market is woefully undersupplied, as is the 905 freehold market. This is where problems lie. People want houses.  We need to offer more freehold lots in Alliston, Shelburne, Hamilton, Guelph, Pickering etc. The Toronto Planning Department has created artificial delays to rezoning applications. They have created new restrictive policies that have eliminated or delaying potential new high-rise and mid-rise housing. The Wynne government is marginalizing the Ontario Municipal Board and allowing the number of chairs or judges to dwindle. It now takes years to get an OMB resolution. Wynne is talking further about marginalization of the OMB which will just accentuate our supply problems and allow prices to surge higher. Now the Wynne government is talking about increasing rent control in properties built after 1991. We can forget about new purpose-built apartments buildings getting built in that environment. We have a pricing crisis and all we have from our two governments is policy that will make it worse. There are 781 condos for sale in the central part of Toronto. Last year there were 1912, a drop of 60%. This is a SUPPLY CRISIS. Only the city and the province can fix it and they need to create expansive land policy now. This will offer alternatives that will help our supply issue resolve themselves over the next 5 years. The reality is that homes in Toronto and vicinity will be expensive. More people will ultimately decide to rent longer than probably planned.

New Details Emerge for 98-Storey Yonge Street Tower

In late February, plans for a 343.9-metre tower were first revealed, with renderings showing a glassy 98-storey tower dominating the Toronto skyline from Yonge and Gerrard. With details of Cresford Developments’ ‘YSL Residences‘ submission to the City of Toronto now available, a fuller picture of the proposal is emerging, shedding light on the project’s planning context, layout, programming, and architectural expression. Designed by New York’s Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates, the American firm is partnering with Toronto’s architectsAlliance, who are acting as architects of record.

YSL - 385 Yonge, Toronto, by Cresford, Kohn Pedersen Fox, architectsAlliance
Looking southeast, image via Cresford Developments

Looking northeast, a new rendering shows a fuller view of the Yonge Street frontage. Stretching north and south sides of the tower’s base, a nine-storey podium building will house a mix of retail, office, and amenity space. Framing the tower, the historic Yonge façades on either side of the super-tall volume will be retained, maintaining the general heritage strategy of Kingsett Capital‘s previous Quadrangle-designed proposal.

YSL - 385 Yonge, Toronto, by Cresford, Kohn Pedersen Fox, architectsAlliance
Looking northeast, the Yonge Street frontage, image via submission to the Cit of Toronto

At 363 Yonge, the three-storey brick building known as the “Richard S. Williams Block” will land the podium on the south side of the site, with the stone “Gerrard Building” continuing to frame the corner of Yonge and Gerrard to the north. The north and west elevations of the Gerrard Building will be preserved, along with the west elevation of Richard S. Willams Block. According to the project’s planing rationale, giving the façades a more three-dimensional quality will be a priority. This may be “accomplished through upgrades to the façade materials in specific areas, or rebuilding with new materials,” and “options will continue to be explored as the design progresses.”

YSL - 385 Yonge, Toronto, by Cresford, Kohn Pedersen Fox, architectsAlliance
The north side of the podium, looking southeast, image via submission to the City of Toronto

In keeping with Kingsett’s 2015 proposal, the smaller properties in the middle of the site will be fully demolished, making way for the residential and retail entrances. Both heritage frontages will also meet the street level with retail, with a pair of residential entrances—leading to two elevator bays—on either side of third retail entrance that leads down to a below-grade commercial space.

YSL - 385 Yonge, Toronto, by Cresford, Kohn Pedersen Fox, architectsAlliance
The ground floor plan, image via submission to the City of Toronto

The podium’s office levels will be accessible via a commercial lobby at the northeast end of the site, fronting Gerrard just west of O’Keefe Lane (seen below). The location of the office lobby may facilitate a partnership with neighbouring Ryerson University, with Cresford and Ryerson currently exploring “potential opportunities to provide the university with permeant access to administrative, academic, or intuitional space within the podium of the proposed building.” According to the submission, potential strategies to animate O’Keefe Lane—also a long-term priority for Ryerson—are also being considered.

YSL - 385 Yonge, Toronto, by Cresford, Kohn Pedersen Fox, architectsAlliance
Looking southwest from Gerrard Street, image via submission to the City of Toronto

While most of the tower’s seven below-grade levels will be given over to a 340-space parking garage and 1,058 lockers, a two-level retail space is planned underground. A knockout panel for a PATH connection is also planned on the west side of the third underground level.

YSL - 385 Yonge, Toronto, by Cresford, Kohn Pedersen Fox, architectsAlliance
The first underground ‘Mezzanine’ level features a multi-level retail space and bike parking, image via submission to the City

Above grade, the podium levels are occupied by retail (which takes up most of the first three above-ground levels), office space, and a rooftop residential amenity space. Of the project’s GFA of 97,386 m², 9,399 m² (9.6%) is given over to retail uses, along with 11,117 m² (11.4%) of office space. The office uses take up the fourth to eighth levels, with residential units—which, at a combined total of 76,870 m², make up almost 79% of the GFA—above.

YSL - 385 Yonge, Toronto, by Cresford, Kohn Pedersen Fox, architectsAlliance
Looking south, the tower’s height is put into perspective alongside the 78-storey Aura, image via Cresford

The 957 condominium suites come in a proposed unit mix of 389 one-bedroom (41%), 459 two-bedroom (48%), and 109 three-bedroom (11%) homes. Ranging in size from 538 ft² to well over 2,000 ft²—for select penthouse suites—the project’s average two-bedroom unit features a floorplan of approximately 860 ft². No studio suites are planned for the building.

YSL - 385 Yonge, Toronto, by Cresford, Kohn Pedersen Fox, architectsAlliance
Typical unit layout (levels 17-32), image via submission to the City of Toronto

Alongside a small terrace space on the 42nd floor—which gives the south elevation its distinctive notch—indoor amenities are concentrated on the 42nd and 43rd levels, where lower-level and shuttle elevators end, and upper-level elevators begin. Accessible from the 43rd floor’s residential lobby, two private elevators lead to the south-side penthouse suites.

YSL - 385 Yonge, Toronto, by Cresford, Kohn Pedersen Fox, architectsAlliance
A residential amenity terrace is planned on the 42nd floor extrusion, image via submission to the City of Toronto

While the building’s smooth glazing is free of balconies, the penthouse units that top the tower feature private outdoor terraces. As the tower footprint gradually shrinks at the upper levels, the stepbacks allow unimpeded terraces (shielded from the wind by glass walls) for select penthouse suites.

YSL - 385 Yonge, Toronto, by Cresford, Kohn Pedersen Fox, architectsAlliance
The 98th floor, image via submission to the City of Toronto

The new planning documents also indicate a rationale for the tower’s 343.9 metre height. According to the submission, the proposed height and massing sees the super-tall tower marginally avoid new shadowing onto the Allan Gardens Conservatory (identified as a “Signature Park” by the City), which is located over 700 metres east of Yonge and Gerrard.

YSL - 385 Yonge, Toronto, by Cresford, Kohn Pedersen Fox, architectsAlliance
Looking northeast, image via submission to the City of Toronto

Finally, the street-level elevations included in the architectural plans give an indication of the tower envelope’s materiality.

YSL - 385 Yonge, Toronto, by Cresford, Kohn Pedersen Fox, architectsAlliance

A detailed look at the east elevation, click for a closer view, image via submission to the City of Toronto

Framed by vertical aluminum fins—which are particularly prominent along the angular north podium volume—curtainwall glazing wraps the body of the tower, while stone elements will be used at street level, and sporadically throughout the lower floors of the podium.

We will keep you updated as more information becomes available, and the project continues to take shape. In the meantime, further information is available via our dataBase file, linked below. Want to share your thoughts? Leave a comment on this page, or join the ongoing conversation in our associated Forum thread.

Source: urbantoronto.ca

Just listed: One of the best condominiums in Toronto-the luxurious Shangri-La residence

2708-180 University Ave, Toronto, ON
Price: $1 385,000

  • Building1450 sq.ft.
  • Fabulous 2 bedroom
  • 3 bathroom suite
  • Top of the line finishes
  • Italian Baffi kitchen cabinets
  • Miele coffee machine and steamer
  • Subzero appliances
  • Heated floors
  • Calacata marble in bathrooms. 

If you would like to discuss options please call us at 416-927-9898 or email at tkonkina@rogers.com and we will get back to you within the next 24 hours.

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Just listed: 3 Bedroom Penthouse. 1965 sq.ft on Yonge and Bloor

35-Hayden-st - Listing35 Hayden St Ph 3102, Toronto, ON
Price: $1 985,000

  • One of the best floor plans
  • South facing terrace
  • West facing balconies.
  • 10 ft. Ceilings
  • Hardwood floors and marble
  • Downsview  kitchen cabinets

 

Overview:  Gorgeous Penthouse With South Facing Terrace And 2 West Facing Balconies With Wood Flooring. Den Could Be A 3D Bedroom, 1956 Sq.Ft Only 2 Suites On Entire Floor. 2 Entrances! Amazing Layout With Enormous Closets Space. 2 Big Bathrooms With Windows, 10′ Ft Ceilings, 9′ Ft Doors, Downsview Kitchen. Fantastic View Of Downtown Toronto And Lake Ontario. Steps To Yonge/ Bloor Subway Line, Yorkville Restaurants, Boutiques. Short Walk To U Of T.

35-Hayden-st - MapExtras: Hardwood Floors, Crown Moldings, Bosh Gas Stove, Dishwasher, Microwave. Liebherr Fridge, Gas Barbecue And Water Lines On The Terrace, Fireplace, Water Filters, Pot Lights All Window Coverings, All Elf Except Dining Room.

If you would like to discuss options please call us at 416-927-9898 or email at tkonkina@rogers.com and we will get back to you within the next 24 hours.

MLS Listing >>

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Newsletter – March 15, 2017

Just listed: 3 Bedroom Penthouse. 1965 sq.ft on Yonge and Bloor

35 Hayden St Ph 3102, Toronto, ON
Price: $1 985,000

  • One of the best floor plans
  • South facing terrace
  • West facing balconies.
  • 10 ft. Ceilings
  • Hardwood floors and marble
  • Downsview  kitchen cabinets

Overview: 
Gorgeous Penthouse With South Facing Terrace And 2 West Facing Balconies With Wood Flooring. Den Could Be A 3D Bedroom, 1956 Sq.Ft Only 2 Suites On Entire Floor. 2 Entrances! Amazing Layout With Enormous Closets Space. 2 Big Bathrooms With Windows, 10′ Ft Ceilings, 9′ Ft Doors, Downsview Kitchen. Fantastic View Of Downtown Toronto And Lake Ontario. Steps To Yonge/ Bloor Subway Line, Yorkville Restaurants, Boutiques. Short Walk To U Of T.

Extras:
Hardwood Floors, Crown Moldings, Bosh Gas Stove, Dishwasher, Microwave. Liebherr Fridge, Gas Barbecue And Water Lines On The Terrace, Fireplace, Water Filters, Pot Lights All Window Coverings, All Elf Except Dining Room.

More Info & Photo Gallery >>
Download MLS Listing (PDF) >>

If you would like to discuss options please call us at 416-927-9898 or email at tkonkina@rogers.com and we will get back to you within the next 24 hours.


Just listed: One of the best condominiums in Toronto-the luxurious Shangri-La residence

2708-180 University Ave, Toronto, ON
Price: $1 385,000

  • 1450 sq.ft.
  • Fabulous 2 bedroom
  • 3 bathroom suite
  • Top of the line finishes
  • Italian Baffi kitchen cabinets
  • Miele coffee machine and steamer
  • Subzero appliances
  • Heated floors
  • Calacata marble in bathrooms. 

 More Info & Photo Gallery >>

If you would like to discuss options please call us at 416-927-9898 or email at tkonkina@rogers.com and we will get back to you within the next 24 hours.


New Details Emerge for 98-Storey Yonge Street Tower


In late February, plans for a 343.9-metre tower were first revealed, with renderings showing a glassy 98-storey tower dominating the Toronto skyline from Yonge and Gerrard.

With details of Cresford Developments’ ‘YSL Residences‘ submission to the City of Toronto now available, a fuller picture of the proposal is emerging, shedding light on the project’s planning context, layout, programming, and architectural expression.

Designed by New York’s Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates, the American firm is partnering with Toronto’s architects Alliance, who are acting as architects of record.

Looking northeast, a new rendering shows a fuller view of the Yonge Street frontage. Stretching north and south sides of the tower’s base, a nine-storey podium building will house a mix of retail, office, and amenity space.Framing the tower, the historic Yonge façades on either side of the super-tall ….

Read Full Article >>

 


Latest house-price indicators from The Economist

newsletter_mar15_chart

The Economist recently published the following chart alongside this article talking about the impact of foreign buyers on global house prices.

They also have this set of interactive graphs that allows you to chart prices according to a number of different measures. The two metrics that The Economist focuses on (above) are house prices against rents and house prices against incomes.

The argument they make is that as (foreign) capital begins to think of property as merely a bolthole, it can start to detach itself from fundamentals such as rents and incomes. New Zealand, Canada, and Australia are specifically called out.

This isn’t necessarily news. And one chart can only tell you so much. But I like staying on top of the various indices.